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Prize Winners with Natasha Soobramanien, Luke Williams, and Dr Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

Prize Winners with Natasha Soobramanien, Luke Williams, and Dr Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

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**FREE EVENT** There is no charge for attending, but please still book your place above.

Natasha Soobramanien and Luke Williams won the Goldsmith's Prize in 2022 for their groundbreaking co-authored novel, Diego Garcia.
The book explores the British government's expulsion of the Chagossian people from the Chagos Islands at the insistence of the US government.

In this special evening, held in collaboration with The Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics (CAPPE), University of Brighton, these award winning writers will explore the relationship between fiction, formal radicalism and politics and how the novel ‘as a political tool for putting possibilities into language’ can provide us with ways to ‘to reimagine the structures of our world’.

Wednesday 19 June | 6.30-8.30pm
University of Brighton City Campus, 58-67 Grand Parade, BN2 0JY

Natasha Soobramanien, British-Mauritian, and Luke Williams, Scottish, used to live in Edinburgh but Natasha now lives in Brussels and Luke in Kilcreggan. Their collaborative novel Diego Garica was published by Fitzcarraldo (UK) and Semiotext(e) (US) in 2022 and won that year's Goldsmith’s Prize.

Dr Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa is a Belgian/Rwandan International Relations scholar and former journalist. She is a senior research fellow of the Johannesburg Institute of Advanced Studies in South Africa and Assistant Professor in Human Rights and Politics at the London School of Economics. Her research and teaching focuses on ways to decolonise international solidarity.

This event is held in collaboration with The Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics (CAPPE) at the University of Brighton, which works across the globe to understand the major issues of the day. It is part of the Cartography of the Political Novel in Europe (CAPONEU) project, which sets out to examine how people in different national and cultural contexts engage with contemporary political issues and thereby have their share in shaping European societies and politics in the 21st century. CAPONEU brings together an interdisciplinary research team that seeks not only to unpack the rich literary heritage of the 20th century but also to make the political novel experiences relevant to our present. CAPONEU is co-funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) under the UK government's Horizon Europe funding guarantee.

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